Bulls n' Bears

Interpreting Conflict Situations is the Key to resolving Them

Knowing how to interpret conflict situations can be the key to resolving them in a way where everyone can feel satisfied with the outcome. When faced with a conflict, it is important to be able to take a step back and look at the situation objectively.

It is important not to take it personally when the other side feels differently than you do. Do not feel that the only way to end it is that one side will win and the other will lose.

Take the time to see how you came to the point where the conflict occurred. You probably already know what your differences are but look deeper to also discover how both sides are alike. Try to find common ground and work on a solution from there. When considering the differences, try to understand why the other side feels as they do. Both sides may feel that they are only doing what is best. This is a good beginning for establishing an amicable resolution.

Being able to interpret the conflict can lead to a better understanding for both sides. Being able to understand each other's feelings can help to diffuse the anger or personal feelings that may cloud the real issues. Interpreting the conflict means being able to discover understand both sides and understanding why they feel as they do. There needs to be a separation of the differences that do matter and the ones that are irrelevant.

Both sides need to be able to look at the situation objectively and also be able to see things from the other side's point of view. This leads to greater understanding of each other and of what the true conflict is. It also helps to establish the common ground that is needed in able to move forward in a positive manner and to an ultimate resolution where everyone wins.

 

 

 

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